A Plain English Guide To British Employment Law

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It’s all in the mind: mental health in the workplace

Mental health charity Mind recently published research based on a survey of 15,000 employees across 30 organisations.  The report reveals a number of differences between men and women noting that ‘although men are more likely to have mental health problems because of their job, women are more likely to open up and seek support from […]

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Uber granted right to appeal against ‘driver as worker’ ruling

Guest blog by Matthew Peach Uber has been granted the right to appeal against last year’s ruling that its UK drivers should be treated as workers, with rights to the minimum wage and holiday pay. The Employment Appeal Tribunal (“EAT”) has scheduled a two-day hearing starting on 27 September. Uber is expected to argue that the […]

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Government rejects calls to ban “sexist” dress codes

The government has rejected calls to change workplace laws on dress codes, in its response to an inquiry. The government reached the conclusion that current regulations are “adequate” – which means that employers can continue to make workers adhere to strict (and sometimes arguably sexist) dress codes. The inquiry, undertaken by Petitions Committee and the Women and Equalities Committee, resulted from […]

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Will AI Replace Human Employment?

A recent report from accountancy firm PwC has found that robotics and artificial intelligence could affect almost a third of UK jobs by the 2030s. The highest likelihood of automation faces sectors such  as transport, manufacturing, and wholesale and retail. This report comes on the back of a 2013 University of Oxford report which concluded that roles among the […]

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European Court of Justice: headscarves can be banned in the workplace

The European Court of Justice (ECJ) has ruled that companies are legally allowed to ban staff from wearing visible religious symbols. Employers now potentially have the right to dismiss employees for not “dressing neutrally” in the workplace, regardless of their competency, as long as they have a policy of neutrality which applies to all religious and political symbolism. […]

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The rise of the gig economy

In recent years, a new employment trend dubbed the ‘gig economy’ has become increasingly popular amongst large corporations. While many will reap the flexible benefits of self employment, it is becoming more prevalent for contract workers to come forward to demand basic employment rights. Some large companies are exploiting “self employed” workers, thereby avoiding paying certain taxes […]

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Navigating your office’s Christmas party

by Adena Graham (https://adenagraham.carbonmade.com/). It’s that time of year again when work halls are decked with boughs of holly and co-workers abandon their work attire for glad-rags. But while work parties can be great for bonding, boosting morale and getting to know your workmates better, the same employment legislation that protects both you and your […]

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Uber drivers classified as workers by Employment Tribunal

On 28th October 2016, the Employment Tribunal ruled that drivers providing ride-hailing services using the Uber app should be legally classified as “workers” – not self employed contractors. As such, they are entitled to certain employment rights, including: the National Minimum Wage minimum paid holiday leave minimum rest breaks and maximum working time protection against illegal discrimination protection for ‘whistleblowing’ […]

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Plight of self-employed workers earning below minimum wage

The story of low paid workers of delivery company Hermes highlighted in The Guardian is just one example of how some employers try to keep their costs down at the expense of their workers. These companies attempt to wriggle out of their employment obligations by using “self employed” workers, who often end up being much […]

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Company sued for making employee bored

Parisian Frédéric Desnard has lodged a claim for €360,000 (£283,000) in compensation from his employer, Interparfum, after he claims he was subjected to “bore out” – think a boring version of “burn out”. He claims that he was essentially denied his managerial duties and not given any interesting work over a period of four years. Mr Desnard […]

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